• February 8, 2019

10 Dog Facts You Didn’t Know

10 Dog Facts You Didn’t Know

10 Dog Facts You Didn’t Know 800 534 Superior Canine

10 DOG FACTS YOU DIDN’T KNOW

There’s nothing we love talking about more than our dogs. Forget the boring small talk – when you run into a fellow dog owner, there’s so much to learn through each other’s experiences. Sharing stories, advice, and dog-related resources is always a welcome topic. Next time you’re on a dog walk date or chatting to the pet store owner, you’ll be armed with 10 new dog facts to share. If you already know some (or all) of these dog facts, then we commend you on your knowledge about dogs!

NEWBORN PUPPIES ARE BLIND AND DEAF

You heard us right – puppies are not able to fully see or hear when they’re first born. From an evolutionary perspective, a shorter gestation period has been favourable for dogs, which in turn leads puppies to be quite helpless at birth. However, after a few weeks of care, puppies slowly begin to mature and gain their senses of sight and hearing.

DALMATIAN PUPPIES ARE BORN WHITE

What’s a Dalmatian without its spots? A puppy, it turns out. They’re born white and start developing their characteristic dark spots a couple of weeks after birth. It turns out Disney had it all wrong with 101 Dalmatians. Bonus fact: demand for the breed skyrocketed after the release of the movie and subsequently resulted in many Dalmatians being surrendered to shelters in the following years.

DOGS HAVE BEEN KEPT AS PETS FOR 12,000 YEARS

History suggests that dogs have been domesticated for roughly 12,000 years. Our ancestors began to train and domesticate wolves in order to help with hunting and fishing, although it’s suspected they became companions as well. With the relationship between man and dog spanning across so many thousands of years, it’s no wonder they’ve become man’s best friend.

SALUKIS ARE THE OLDEST KNOWN BREED

Domesticated by Egyptians, Salukis are suspected to be the oldest known dog breed. Now, they continue to make great companions in homes around the world. Before welcoming a Saluki into your life, it’s important to note that they require regular grooming, as well as ample opportunities to exercise their innate desire to run and chase.

YAWNING IS CONTAGIOUS FROM HUMANS TO DOGS

And vice versa. We all know the feeling. Your coworker or spouse yawns, then next thing you know you catch yourself yawning too. It’s not just contagious among humans, we can make our dogs yawn too. This has been demonstrated through controlled scientific studies, but there’s no harm in testing it out with your dog too.

DOGS ONLY HAVE SWEAT GLANDS IN THEIR PAWS

Keeping your dog cool is a big deal. Heat stroke is a potentially life threatening concern, especially during the warmer seasons. While dogs only have sweat glands in their paws, they also use panting as a method to bring down their body temperature. If your dog is excessively panting, immediately take them to a cooler space to rest and drink water, then consult the advice of your veterinarian.

BASENJIS DON’T BARK, THEY YODEL

A dog breed that doesn’t bark? Who knew. Basenjis are often known for their curly tails, but it turns out their barking – or lack of it – makes them unique, too. Instead of barking, they make a special yodeling sound, which can be just as loud as barking. Aside from their episodes of yodeling, basenjis are a relatively quiet breed.

ADULT DOGS HAVE 42 TEETH

Humans have an average of 32 teeth, whereas dogs come in at a whopping 42. We may not share the same amount of teeth, but it’s equally important to protect your dog’s teeth as it is your own. It’s important to regularly check your dog’s mouth for signs of decay and bad breath, as well as to have your veterinarian take a look at your dog’s appointments.

CHOW CHOWS HAVE BLUE TONGUES

Blue, black, or even purple-coloured tongues are all common among Chow Chows. While the dog community has remained curious about this phenomenon for years, unfortunately the cause still remains a mystery. For now, we’ll just have to appreciate this breed’s unique features without knowing how they came to fruition.

JUST LIKE FINGERPRINTS, EVERY NOSEPRINT IS UNIQUE

Not only does every dog have a unique noseprint, they can also be identified by it. Human fingerprinting is an invaluable tool in forensics and technology, even lending to the ability to unlock your phone with the touch of your finger. What could the future hold for noseprints? Perhaps a global database could potentially help get lost dogs back to their owners.


We hope you’ve enjoyed learning about these dog facts. While we spend every day with dogs, we find there’s always more to learn, especially when it comes to their history. Over the course of tens of thousands of years, humans have domesticated and bred a broad array of breeds, each with their own special characteristics. From blue tongues to yodeling, we’re endlessly fascinated by what makes each breed unique. We’d like to know, what are your favourite dog facts?

Trust the Superior Method.